Mosquito Control

The first three stages—egg, larva, and pupa—are largely aquatic. These stages typically last five to 14 days, depending on the species and the ambient temperature.... Bloodsucking mosquitoes, depending on species, gender, and weather conditions, have potential adult lifespans ranging from as short as a week to as long as several months. (Wikipedia, Mosquito)

The first three stages—egg, larva, and pupa—are largely aquatic. These stages typically last five to 14 days, depending on the species and the ambient temperature.... Bloodsucking mosquitoes, depending on species, gender, and weather conditions, have potential adult lifespans ranging from as short as a week to as long as several months. (Wikipedia, Mosquito)

Cardston has its share of mosquitos during the summer months, when conditions are right and there are bodies of still water laying around. 

In an attempt to get a handle the mosquito problem, the Town has engaged in an aggressive mosquito control program.

We focus on both larvicide and on adulticide to control the population as much as possible. Larvicide is carried out by adding a chemical to stagnant water supplies that either kills or prevents the maturation of mosquitos in the pupa or larval stage. It is the most effective method of mosquito prevention, since there can be tens of thousands of mosquito larva killed with a single application in a larger body of stagnant water like a pond. 

Adulticide is much less effective. The Town conducts spraying, or fogging, certain areas with a pesticide called Malathion ULV (Ultra Low Volume). Application of Malathion can only occur on days that fall within a certain range of heat, moisture, and wind so the exact day and time of the applications is always uncertain. Further, the malathion dissipates quite rapidly and only affects those mosquitos it comes directly into contact with. So while fogging may appear more effective than larvicide, it generally kills only a fraction of the number larvicide does.

We encourage all Town residents to educate themselves regarding Malathion ULV in preparation for summertime application so that all residents and households in Town can keep themselves safe while spraying is ongoing. We have assembled a short list of government prepared documents that explain how Malathion works, the potential dangers to humans, and how to stay safe.

To ensure your health and that of your family, please stay away from the applicator while adulticiding is taking place. If you have respiratory problems, allergies, small children, or if you are pregnant or nursing please stay inside with the windows closed and the A/C shut off to avoid breathing in the airborne pesticide. If you are concerned about Malathion ULV fogging near your residence, please submit your concern to the Town at info@cardston.ca.

Street Snow Removal

The Town of Cardston works to make our roads as safe as possible during the winter months, while conserving tax dollars. We have developed a map of priority routes that focuses on providing emergency personnel with access to key facilities, and opening up the main arteries of the the Town for access. 

Please be advised that routes listed as Priority Levels 1 and 2 may get plowed repeatedly before Priority levels 3, 4, and 5 if snow continues to fall.

Note: This schedule is a guideline only. After inspection, the Supervisor, at his discretion may adjust the priorities to meet needs and conditions.  


Town Staff and Departments

  • Chief Administrative Officer: Jeff Shaw
    • Director of Corporate Services: Jill Heninger
      • Municipal Clerk: Terah Thesen
      • Municipal Clerk: Angel Saddleback
    • Director of Infrastructure Services: Bart Atwood
    • Communications Clerk: Shem Simmons
    • Bylaw Enforcement and Peace Officer: Lloyd Stewart
    • Development Officer: Nolan Card
    • Electrical Foreman: Lennard Nichols
    • Engineering and Project Manager: Brandon Jensen
    • FCSS Director: Terah Thesen
    • Parks and Recreation
      • Foreman: Randy Russell
        • Jeff Heggie
        • Don Nelson
        • Doug Sanders
    • Public Works
      • Foreman: Tim Bevans
        • Don Weston
        • LaNark Duce
        • Mario Ringwald
        • Waid Isfeld
    • Water-Wastewater
      • Foreman: Bart Atwood
        • Curtis Kerr
        • Don Braun

Contractors

Sewer

 

Cardston has a recently updated Sewer Treatment Plant. The upgrades to our plant improved performance of our infrastructure and mitigated damages to our surrounding environment. In order to ensure that our sewer system is well maintained and is self sufficient, the following rates are charged to all locations connected to the system.

Monthly Charge

Consumption Charge

In Town Residential
In Town Multi-Unit

Blood Reserve Residential
County Residential

$40.50
$40.50 for First Unit
$20.50 for Subsequent Units
$60.75
$60.75

N/A
$0.34/m3
$0.34/m3
N/A
N/A

In Town Commercial with Meter

$40.50

20 – 50 m3 – $1.35/m3
51 – 100 m3 – $1.15/m3
101 – 250 m3 – $0.95/m3
250+ m3– $0.74/m3

In Town Commercial without Meter
Blood Reserve Commercial 

Institutional

$100
$100

$40.50

N/A
N/A

20 – 50 m3 – $2.03/m3
51 – 100 m3 – $1.72/m3
101 – 250 m3 – $1.42/m3
250+ m3 – $1.11/m3

Commercial Water Loss Factor
A water loss factor may be applied to non-residential customers that have significant water loss. Water loss is defined as incoming metered water that is diverted away from the town’s sewer system, and therefore does not get treated. For example, commercial customers with significant irrigation or water consumed in a product or manufacturing process may qualify for a water loss factor. Customers that have significant water loss can make application to the town for consideration of a water loss factor. The customer will be required to prove significant water loss.

Institutional Water Loss Factor
A water loss factor may be applied to Institutional customers that have significant use of metered water for irrigation purposes. Where there is significant irrigation use, billing will be capped at the maximum of average winter water consumption from November 1st to March 31st of the previous year. In cases where there is no historical data, average winter consumption will be based on similar properties or other relevant measures.